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Wednesday, 2 September 2015

Tricorn - A very early all-GRP cruising dinghy

The Tricorn dinghy was designed by Illingworth and Primrose in 1962. Since theirs was one of the most famous names in offshore racing yacht design at the time, she came with some impressive pedigree. The design brief appears to have been to create a low maintenance dinghy, capable of serious open water passage-making, that would be better and faster than Ian Proctor's well proven and famous Wayfarer class.

Back then in the early 60s there were very few dinghies purpose-designed for construction in GRP. Almost certainly this was the first boat of any type designed by Illingworth and Primrose for this type of construction, and at the time the Wayfarer would only have been available in plywood, so although Angus Primrose had certainly designed dinghies before, the Tricorn brief must have come as a considerable new challenge. His approach, in common with most other designers who were learning to work with this little known material, was make the boat strong and not to spare on materials. When you examine the layup of a Tricorn, you'll notice a predominance of woven rovings throughout, and lots of reinforcement in areas where a contemporary wooden or plywood dinghy might have had a tendency to develop stress cracks or other weakness.

Very unusually for such an early fibreglass boat, there is almost no wood, except for the tiller, rudder, and some backing pads for deck fittings. This may have been a bit too avant-garde for the times, since boat enthusiasts in those days would have expected quite a lot of visible wood trim, coamings, decks, floorboards, benches, hatches, etc. The all plastic Tricorn might have been regarded as just too space-age and factory produced, and this perception, as well as its price and the narrowness of its marketing concept, may have seriously limited sales. Eventually only 37 were built.

Not that there was anything wrong with the performance of the Tricorn, nor its ability to shelter its crew of 2 adults, plus maybe a child, for overnight camping stops. Contemporary boat tests make it clear that Tricorn had the edge over the Wayfarer in both departments, although nowadays, after 50 years of Wayfarer class development, the Tricorn would probably struggle to keep up on some points.

Almost certainly, however, Tricorn would still show a Wayfarer a clean pair of heels to windward, since with her centreplate fully down she draws 1.6m (5ft 3in) to the Wayfarer's 1.17m (3ft 10in). She is also a few inches longer overall and carries around 1sqm more windward sail. Compared to the Wayfarer, Tricorn is noticeably less stable at rest, though she stiffens up when under way.

Tricorn's domed foredeck and short cabin roof enclose a cuddy with sitting space for 4 adults or sleeping space for 2 (in quarter berths extending under the cockpit side benches). There would be just enough space left over in camping mode for a child of up to about 11 years old to stretch out. There's a large watertight locker aft, and two capacious cockpit side lockers, probably not really totally watertight in the event of capsize, but which resist rain, spray, and even a fair amount of solid water landing in the cockpit.

4 years or so ago, I found and bought an old Tricorn. It was very scruffy, had a hole in the bottom, and lacked its original moulded forehatch cover as well as the original winch for lifting the centreplate. This 1963 example had at some time been used as a sailing school boat and was fitted with a horrible non-original rusty steel plate, weighing in at 50kg or more, double the original design spec. In addition, the mainsail had been reduced in area by cutting the foot off it to a depth of about 1m. These modifications must have made her extremely slow and dull to sail.

Salvo is now back in sailing order with a few minor changes to her original specification. I changed the overweight rusty centreplate to one that weighs about 20kg, about the same as the original design, but mine is home-made from a sandwich of steel, epoxy and plywood. I had to give up on finding an original plate lifting winch and fitted a simple tackle instead. I made a forehatch cover from plywood and clear polycarbonate, and lastly, I changed from a transom mainsheet track to centre sheeting for no better reason than I was scared the sheet might foul on my outboard motor and cause a capsize. The old roller reefing boom was replaced by one from a Fireball, to which I fixed some fittings for slab reefing.

I made a new rudder blade cut from the plywood centreboard from an old Miracle dinghy, but it snapped in half in a fearsome tiderace in Brittany, so I have gone back to the original which I might repropuce in aluminium plate.

There are still a lot of niggling problems to sort out. For instance the original self bailers let more water in to the watertight cockpit than they remove, so my feet are always wet. The in-mast jib halyard emerges from the mast foot in such a way that it is difficult to tension properly. I'm considering making it external from a point just below the spreaders so that I can swig it up tight. Most importantly, because of the total lack of rowlocks, a rowing thwart, and a stowage space long enough for decent oars, it's impossible to row the boat in the event of flat calm and engine failure. Emergency propulsion consists of a long paddle at the moment.

In spite of the age of the design, and these minor shortcomings, I like my Tricorn.  She is a fine, strong, and capable boat - with one hell of a pedigree!  

Tricorn Sailing Dinghy
Designed by Illingworth and Primrose, 1962
Built by Martin Goacher Ltd.

LOA:  16ft 6in (5m03)
LWL:  15ft (4m57)
Beam:  6ft 2in (1m87)
Draft:  9in (0m22) plate up, 5ft 3in (1m60) plate lowered.
Air draft:  24ft 6in (7m46)
Sail area:  139 sq ft (12.91sqm)
Weight in sailing trim: approx. 580lbs (263Kg)

Link: http://bursledonblog.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/tricorn-dinghy.html

31 comments:

  1. Congratulations on your restoration. She looks good. I love the Wayfarer dinghy and have enjoyed reading about her ocean voyaging and coastal sailing but if I had to choose I would choose the Tricom - She looks great!

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  2. You might find this of interest...http://bursledonblog.blogspot.co.nz/2012/06/small-world.html

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  3. Thanks Paul - I took a look again at Max's blog and saw your boat. The Whiting looks very similar to the Tricon in concept, a concept I like a lot. Do you still have her? Are you able to sleep inside your little cuddy cabin?

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  4. Great boat! Glad she is now in your capable hands. This is a boat who's time has come again. Someone should start making her again.

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  5. Hi Alden, yes I still have her,don't think I could ever part. Two can sleep in the cuddly as long as they are good friends,but the cockpit is the crowning glory with the room of a thirty footer. Again like the Tricon

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  6. Paul, I really like the look of your Whiting. The Tricorn's cockpit, though it looks big, is cluttered a bit by the long c/b case, and the big locker aft takes up a lot of space. The Whiting seems to have plenty of unencumbered cockpit space, and the look of a bigger boat.

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  7. Thanks Patrick,like the Tricorn, sadly also no longer in production. In my view she is just about the perfect concept for an easily handled (afloat and ashore) trailer yacht.

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  8. Patrick thanks for posting such an interesting thread, I like both the Tricorn and the Whiting - for a while I've had my eye out for an old Westerly Nimrod at the right price, but I think both these boats are better. Having just finished a 5 year restoration or Erica's SCOW (work and life got in the way far too often) I'm of the opinion that building from scratch can be quicker and easier. To Alden's point might be worth trying to find a designer who could produce an updated version - or maybe update the lines into Defltship if I find some time over winter would be a start and then take the best from each to redesign the cockpit/interior.

    Best regards

    Max

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  13. The boat looks gorgeous. You did a phenomenal job on the restoration. Thank you for the post!

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  19. Driving back from St. Andrews New Brunswick, quite by accident, came across the Tricorn which my father bought on the day I was born June 14th, 1962. We lived in Port Cartier Quebec at that time, and then moved home to New Brunswick. Dad sold it in 1965 when he bought a 32 foot wooden schooner that had just been built in Chester Nova Scotia, on spec.

    If I take her and do fix her up I hope to do as good as you have done. Nice work. She is going to need a lot of work, but if anyone is going to fix up the old girl it should be her long lost twin brother. :-)

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  20. Here is my facebook page with photos taken today of M'Lady in her present condition.
    She was built in 1962. Not sure of hull number as the builders plate has peeled off in places.
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1051391631593939&set=pcb.1051394651593637&type=3&theater

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  21. James - nice boat - incredible really that a boat which must be 50 years old is in such good or at least easilly repairable condition

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  22. Hi Patrick, look like a good job.
    If you need some materials or help on further restoration feel free to contact me. I have a friend of mine working on similar boats for customers of our boat shop.

    George
    http://www.jon-boats-for-sale.com

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  23. This is the perfect blog for anyone who wants to know about this topic. Almost certainly this was the first Seafarer boats of any type designed by this company.
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  25. Great information! The Tricorn dinghy looks great after your restoration work. Tricorn seems to be the early version of modern sailing boats, which vacationers often charter for sailing vacation destinations such as Cancun. Thanks for the post!!

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  28. Only 37 built ? - curious, my sail no is 55 ("Sandpiper" is in the process of being "rebuilt").

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